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2 edition of Hydrotropic pulping of the bark from Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) franco) and the characterization of the resulting bark phenolic acid found in the catalog.

Hydrotropic pulping of the bark from Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) franco) and the characterization of the resulting bark phenolic acid

Bernard L. Lenz

Hydrotropic pulping of the bark from Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) franco) and the characterization of the resulting bark phenolic acid

by Bernard L. Lenz

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  • 7 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir.,
  • Bark.,
  • Wood-pulp.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Bernard L. Lenz.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination66 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages66
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14300559M

    Books at Amazon. The Books homepage helps you explore Earth's Biggest Bookstore without ever leaving the comfort of your couch. Here you'll find current best sellers in books, new releases in books, deals in books, Kindle eBooks, Audible audiobooks, and so much more. Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii, also known as Coast Douglas-fir, Pacific Douglas-fir, Oregon pine, or Douglas spruce, is an evergreen conifer native to western North America from west-central British Columbia, Canada southward to central California, United Oregon and Washington its range is continuous from the Cascades crest west to the Pacific Coast Ranges and Pacific : Pinaceae.

      DNR forest health specialists examined Douglas-firs with these symptoms and found unexpected levels of attack by several species of bark beetles such as Douglas-fir engraver, (Scolytus unispinosus), Douglas-fir pole beetle (Pseudohylesinus nebulosus), and another engraver beetle, Scolytus monticolae, that has no common name. Douglas-fir engraver. Simpson uses waste and scrap from its softwood lumber mills to make paper, but high quality paper requires short-fibered hardwood pulp blended in with long-fibered pulp from conifers like Douglas fir.

    Douglas-fir Pseudotsyqa mønziesii SIZE AT AGE LIFE SPAN: NEEDLES: CONES: BARK: feet tall feet in diameter years 3//4" long. Flattened all around the twig. Soft to the touch. Cylindrical cones. " long with 3 pointed bract pro- truding from scales. Dark gray brown. Corky looking, deeply furrowed in mature trees. Inside. United States Bark Scoring Problem Grafts in Five Douglas-Fir Seed Orchards: A Case History Forest Sevice Pacific Northwest Research Station Research Note PNW-RN March Abstract Introd ucti on Donald L. Copes A bark-scoring trial was carried out on .


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Hydrotropic pulping of the bark from Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) franco) and the characterization of the resulting bark phenolic acid by Bernard L. Lenz Download PDF EPUB FB2

Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation Hydrotropic pulping of the bark from Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) franco) and the characterization of the resulting "bark phenolic acid" Public Deposited. Analytics × Add to Author: Bernard L.

Lenz. LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Physical and chemical properties of Douglas fir bark and wood. 9 2. Comparison of wood and bark hydrotropi pulping.e.

s e s e s e s s s e e e 18 3, Preliminary cooks of bark bast fibers comparing varions hydrotropic agents. 19 Pulping of bast Livers with selected hydrotropic agents and sodium hydroxide. suitability of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) pulpwood for the production of supercalandered magazine paper.

The results of the present study show, that Douglas fir mechanical pulp can be used for the production of supercalandered magazine paper but the achieved paper quality is inferior than using Norway spruce (Picea abies) mechanical pulp.

Douglas-fir feedstocks containing bark (10, 20, 30 and % w/w) were pretreated under medium-severity to evaluate bark's impact on bioconversion. Bark had only a minor impact on the yield of hemicellulose sugars, with no negative effect on the monomeric sugar recovery.

However, bark caused a significant decrease in the soluble sugar concentration. spruces. With theexception of California fir, they are red comparable with spruce in pulp quality. California red fir gives a rather dark groundwood pulp, and the sulfite and sulfate pulps made from it are harder to bleach than those of spruce.

Baldcypress, Douglas-fir, larches File Size: KB. • Douglas fir bark – Primary container component • Fresh and aged bark are used • Aged bark – Large piles sit undisturbed for several months. – Not composted. Aged Fresh. Particle distribution of raw bark 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 0 1 2 4 Sieve size (mm) Bark (%) AgedFile Size: 2MB.

This report is an investigation into the marketing strategies for small diameter Douglas-fir logs. The Cariboo Forest Region in British Columbia is overcrowded with small diameter Douglas-fir trees.

This poses several environmental problems in the region, which includes the reduction in large diameter trees and mule deer populations, and an increased probability of serious forest fires.

Biermann's Handbook of Pulp and Paper: Raw Material and Pulp Making, Third Edition is a comprehensive reference for industry and academia covering the entire gamut of pulping technology.

This book provides a thorough introduction to the entire technology of pulp manufacture; features chapters covering all aspects of pulping from wood handling. Bark: You can usually identify a large Douglas Fir by the bark alone.

On large trees, the thick bark is deeply furrowed, more than any other tree in the region. The color is gray to brown and usually brown at the bottom of the furrows. Where it grows: Douglas Fir is the state tree of Oregon and by far the most common conifer in the state.

This book chapter provides the properties, production, and applications of Trichoderma enzymes within food industry. A softwood kraft pulp derived primarily from Douglas-fir was used in. Hydrotropic pulping of the bark from Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) franco) and the characterization of the resulting "bark phenolic acid" By Abstract.

mechanical pulp of the four, making it the preferred genus for high-yield pulping. Douglas-fir, giving low strength and low brightness, is rarely used in mechanical pulping.

Table 2. Typical pulp properties and energy consumptions of different species compared with spruce groundwood (Kurdin, ; Hatton and Cook, ). Spruce Genus. Recovery from pulping wood is commonly expressed as the percentage, by oven-dry weight, of pulp obtained from the original wood weight.

A recovery value of 45% means that for every oven-dry pounds of wood processed, 45 oven-dry pounds of pulp is produced. When expressed in this manner, pulp yield is mainly a function of the pulp-ing process.

NWLRAG LOG GRADES vs. LOG SORTS D. Buck off excessive butt defect, swelled or bark seamy butts, and hooked &/or twisted butts. 12'' logs with sweep or crook = 2' max. L deduction.

All logs must be well trimmed. These PULP logs just do not meet the companies minimum Size: KB. Cork and phloem from Douglas fir outer bark 9 Patel, R.N. () Bark anatomy of radi ata pine, corsican pine, and Douglas fir grown in New Zealand.

Douglas Fir - timber properties Originally from British Columbia and the Pacific coast of the US, the Douglas fir adapts well to varying conditions. It is a valuable timber tree and one of the world’s outstanding softwoods. The wood is pale to medium red-brown, with conspicuous growth ring configuration.

It is straight grained and resinous. It is suitable for pulp and for making boxes and crates. Bark on young trees contains blisters filled with resin (Canada balsam) which can be used in cementing lenses and mounting specimens for observation with a microscope.

Balsam fir also makes a good Christmas tree. Pratima Bajpai, in Biermann's Handbook of Pulp and Paper (Third Edition), Turpentine. Some turpentine and rosin are obtained by using steam distillation or by extraction of pine stumps. Arabinogalactan, which is a hemicellulose gum extracted from larch, is used in place of gum arabic.

Phenolic acids extracted from the bark of various conifers are used as extenders for synthetic resin. The resultant Douglas-fir forest residue labeled as FS had a bark content of % compared with % in the as-harvested residue to result in a lower lignin and higher carbohydrate contents of % and %, respectively, than the % and % of the as-harvested residue (Table 1).

Upgrading through screening increased the carbohydrate Cited by: The coast Douglas-fir variety is the dominant tree west of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Northwest, occurring in nearly all forest types, competes well on most parent materials, aspects, and slopes.

Adapted to a moist, mild climate, it grows larger and faster than Rocky Mountain : Pinaceae. grey-brown bark covered with resin-filled blisters. Mature trees have thick, reddish-brown bark that is deeply ridged with furrows. bark of a young Douglas-fir b ark of a m ture Douglas-fir Insects that feed on needles are called d e f o l i a t o r s.

Caterpillars, the pre-adult form of butterflies and moths, are common defolia-tors. Severe File Size: 1MB.Douglas-fir is not a true fir at all, nor a pine or spruce. It is a distinct species named after its discoverer Archibald Menzies and a botanist, David Douglas. A major characteristic that distinguishes it from true firs is its cone which falls from the tree intact.

Douglas-fir is one of the world's most important and valuable timber trees."Anthraquinone Pulping: A TAPPI PRESS Anthology of Published Papers" Edited by, Gopal C. Goyal Page 2 of 9 Soda-AQ Pulping and the Tear Strength Problem / 84 Nelson, P.J., and Irvine, G.M., TAPPI International Symposium on Wood and Pulping .